Research

"Before we started our work, people thought that weather was predictable for only a few days and climate was not predictable. We were the first ones to show that there is predictability in the midst of chaos."

Jagadish Shukla, Professor

Selected Research

  • The Office of Naval Research awarded $4.54 million Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative award to Claudio Cioffi-Revilla (Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study), Kenneth De Jong (Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study), Carol Ember (Yale University), and Sean Luke (Volgenau School of Engineering) to better understand potential social effects of climate change using advanced computer simulation models, applied to East Africa.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $3.8 million to Jagadish Shukla (College of Science) and James Kinter (Center for Ocean-Land Atmosphere Studies) to study the predictability of seasonal to decadal variations of climate and climate change using complex climate models. 

  • The Institute of Global Environment and Society (Prime: National Science Foundation) awarded $2.4 million to Edwin Schneider (College of Science) to conduct climate research on predictability of the Earth’s climate.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $1.68 million to Claudio Cioffi-Revilla (Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study), Sean Luke (Volgenau School of Engineering), J. Daniel Rogers (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History), and Paul Schopf (College of Science) to better understand potential social effects of climate change using advanced computer simulation models, applied to Subsaharan Africa and Northern Circumboreal regions.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $1.6 million to Edward Maibach (College of Humanities and Social Sciences) for three research projects focused on exploring the potential of local TV weathercasters to educate the public about climate change.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $1.25 million to Edward Maibach (College of Humanities and Social Sciences), Sara Cobb (School for Conflict Resolution and Analysis), Anthony Leiserowitz (Yale), and Martin Hoerling (NOAA) to plan a public-private partnership to help TV weathercasters become effective climate educators.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $640,000 to Susie Crate (College of Science) to systematically document, model, and interpret key linkages between physical, biological and human systems in the context of changing seasonality (phenology) due to global and local climate change.

  • The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded $550,000 to Zafer Boybeyi (College of Science) to study aerosol effects on microphysical structure and radiative properties of Arctic clouds and hence on weather and climate.

  • The Department of Commerce awarded $491,000 to Jian Lu (College of Science) and Gang Chen (Cornell University) to understand the global atmospheric circulation response to greenhouse gas induced global warming.

  • The National Science Foundation awarded $299,793 to Christiana Stan (College of Science) and David Randall (Colorado State University) to investigate the impact of high-frequency ocean processes on the intraseasonal variability of the tropical atmosphere.

  • NASA awarded $290,000 to Long Chiu (College of Science) to develop satellite-based oceanic rainfall histograms to support global rainfall analysis and climate studies.

  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration awarded $290,000 to Long Chiu (College of Science) and Robert Adler (UMCP) to develop a transfer technique for estimating oceanic rainfall to NOAA for operational processing.

  • The Center for Multi-Scale Modeling Framework of Atmospheric Processes (Prime: National Science Foundation) awarded a $207,331 sub-award to Christiana Stan (College of Science) to implement the cloud model developed by CMMAP into the Community Atmospheric Model and conduct numerical experiments focused on understanding the climate variability under increased green-house gas concentrations.

  • The Joint Fire Science Program and US Geological Survey awarded $194,000 to William Sommers (Mason Center for Climate and Society), Susan G. Conard and Stanley G. Coloff to investigate fire regimes and climate dependent ecosystem characteristics as a basis for understanding 21st Century climate change impacts.

  • The USDA Forest Service awarded $125,000 to William Sommers (Mason Center for Climate and Society), Susan G. Conard and Stanley G. Coloff to categorize and quantify climate change impacts of forest fire emissions of GHG, Aerosols and black carbon.